Azkals feel heat

first_imgAFF Suzuki Cup match between Philippines and Singapore at Philippine Sports Stadium in Bulacan. Photo by Sherwin Vardeleon/INQUIRERBocaue, Bulacan— Faced with the difficult task of taking points from the two teams that have impressed in the tournament so far, the Philippines remains upbeat it can still survive the AFF Suzuki Cup’s Group of Death here.The scoreless draw against 10-man Singapore before a sparse crowd at Philippine Sports Stadium Saturday night just cranked up the pressure on the Azkals, who face a mountain to climb in their last two matches in Group A starting with Indonesia Tuesday.ADVERTISEMENT We are young Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 MOST READ Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND EDITORS’ PICK Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportscenter_img As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise The Azkals were left frustrated by a combination of some stout Singapore defending, stellar goalkeeping and incessant time-wasting by the Lions, who played with a man disadvantage for almost an hour after Hafiz Sujad was sent off for a dangerous challenge on Younghusband.Lacking cutting edge in the final third, the Azkals found it difficult to break down the Lions, who were content to soak up the pressure to salvage the point.Azkals coach Thomas Dooley did tinker his lineup in the second half in a bid to maximize the advantage, but Pika Minegishi and Stephan Schrock wasted good chances.The lack of goals once again put Dooley’s decision to place Younghusband in a defensive midfield role under the microscope. Misagh Bahadoran started but he was also starved of service. The Azkals’ top scorer the past two years was largely invisible in the match before he was subbed off early in the second half.The German-American mentor defended his ploy, stressing that the team is able to maximize Younghusband’s quality on the ball and playmaking in his current position.ADVERTISEMENT All Stars play for a cause The Merah Putih showed their pedigree even in the 2-4 loss to Thailand on opening day, and the Azkals could see their hopes of qualifying to a fourth straight semifinals vanish if they misfire once more.The Azkals have never won against the Thais, whom they face Friday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“We always said we want to be at six points when we face Thailand,” said Azkals captain Phil Younghusband, whose team is level with Singapore with one point.“It’s not happening now, but we’re still confident we can advance. We have the quality in the team, but we have to play better, work harder and convert our chances.” “It’s his best position right now and he stood out against Singapore,” said Dooley.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

Illegal logging persists in Borneo orangutan habitat despite government ban

first_imgIllegal logging continues inside an orangutan habitat in Borneo that the Indonesian government had decreed off-limits last year, an investigation by Greenpeace has found.The group reported at least six logging camps in the concession held by a timber company, but noted that it was unclear whether the company itself, PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa (MPK), was engaged in the illegal logging.This is the second time Greenpeace has found indications of commercial exploitation in the area since the government ordered PT MPK to halt its operations last year. JAKARTA — At least six illegal logging camps have sprung up in a peat forest in Indonesian Borneo that the government had declared off-limits last year, a Greenpeace investigation has revealed.The environmental group’s probe in March this year found the camps inside a concession held by timber company PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa (MPK), in the Ketapang district of West Kalimantan province.The concession itself covers 484 square kilometers (187 square miles) of land, or 85 percent of the Sungai Putri landscape, home to an estimated 950 to 1,200 critically endangered Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and one of the last pristine coastal peat swamp forests remaining on the island of Borneo.A pooling area for processed wood, which also serves as one of at least six camps for illegal loggers inside PT MPK’s concession in Sungai Putri, Ketapang, West Kalimantan. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Sawn timber piled up inside the PT MPK concession in Sungai Putri, Ketapang, West Kalimantan. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Greenpeace said logging was taking place at night, including in locations where orangutan nests were found, and ending just before dawn as trucks arrived to transport the woodpiles to nearby sawmills and furniture shops.“This is a major embarrassment for the Indonesian government, which has consistently promised to protect Sungai Putri,” Greenpeace campaigner Ratri Kusumohartono said in a statement.In March 2017, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry ordered PT MPK to cease its operations in the area because they violated a moratorium on peatland development. Photos emerged of a huge canal the company had dug to drain the forest in preparation for what it called a trial plantation as well as for transporting felled logs to a sawmill.Large-scale drainage of Indonesia’s vast peat swamps, in particular by palm oil and pulpwood companies, has left the land highly combustible, exacerbating annual fires that are usually sparked for slash-and-burn clearing activities.The Greenpeace exposé is the second investigation that has revealed continued commercial exploitation of the Sungai Putri forest in defiance of the government order for a halt to such activities. In November last year, the NGO published photos that showed an extensive canal full of water, alongside excavators and pulpwood tree seedlings being planted.“The government cannot let this stand — it must uphold the law and ensure the full and permanent protection of this beautiful and important forest,” Ratri said.Greenpeace noted it was unclear whether PT MPK was carrying out the logging or if other parties were taking advantage of roads built by the company to further encroach on the forest and orangutan habitat.PT MPK, linked to a Chinese investment firm, obtained permits in 2008 from the government to log the area. Logging activities are strongly supported by the provincial government as a means of boosting investment in the region. PT MPK did not immediately respond to Mongabay’s requests for comment on Greenpeace’s latest findings.The canal through the peat swamp forest in Sungai Putri allegedly dug by PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa. Image courtesy of International Animal Rescue.Global Forest Watch Commodities map showing PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa’s concession in Sungai Putri, including the concession area and peat depth. Image courtesy of World Resources Institute.“Habitat destruction forces orangutans to enter neighboring plantations and farms looking for food and this frequently leads to conflict with humans,” Karmele Llano Sanchez, program director of International Animal Rescue in Indonesia, said in the statement.“Sungai Putri is home to one of the largest populations in the world and we are at a critical point for the Bornean orangutan, without forests like this they can’t survive,” she added.Sungai Putri hosts “one of the largest unprotected [orangutan] populations in the whole of Indonesia,” according to a 2016 joint report by the Borneo Nature Foundation and International Animal Rescue. Ratri said the survival of the species “relies on creating wildlife havens and protecting the existing ones” like Sungai Putri.“It is time for the Indonesian government to ensure the full protection of Sungai Putri, its environment and wildlife,” she said.Pooling area for processed wood and a camp for illegal loggers inside the PT MPK concession in Sungai Putri, Ketapang, West Kalimantan. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Wood ready to be collected by illegal loggers inside PT MPK’s concession in Sungai Putri, Ketapang, West Kalimantan. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Borneo Orangutan, Community Forests, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forestry, Forests, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Illegal Logging, Logging, Orangutans, Peatlands, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

EU demand siphons illicit timber from Ukraine, investigation finds

first_imgAnimals, boreal forests, Certification, Conservation, Corruption, Deforestation, Economics, Environment, Forest Stewardship Council, Forestry, Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Logging, Mammals, Pulp And Paper, Sustainability, Sustainable Forest Management, Temperate Forests, Timber, Timber Laws, timber trade, Trees, Wildlife Article published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Corrupt management of Ukraine’s timber sector is supplying the EU with large amounts of wood from the country’s dense forests.The London-based investigative nonprofit Earthsight found evidence that forestry officials have taken bribes to supply major European firms with Ukrainian wood that may have been harvested illegally.Earthsight argues that EU-based companies are not carrying out the due diligence that the EU Timber Regulation requires when buying from “high-risk” sources of timber. Lax due diligence by European companies is driving the illegal harvest of timber in Ukraine, one of the largest suppliers to the continent, according to a report published July 14.“It’s a huge source of high-risk timber coming into the EU,” said Sam Lawson, who directs the London-based investigative non-profit Earthsight.Ukraine holds some of Europe’s largest tracts of unspoiled forests. But those forests, home to brown bears (Ursus arctos arctos), wolves (Canis lupus lupus), and bison (Bison bonasus), also supply more “high-risk timber” to the EU than all countries in the tropics combined, Lawson said. Earthsight carried out a two-year probe into the country’s timber sector, digging through court documents and customs records, interviewing industry staff and government officials, and conducting on-the-ground and under cover investigations.Video © Earthsight.The effort uncovered evidence of corruption on the part of government-run “state forestry enterprises” and department heads in Ukraine. They also traced the tendrils of that corruption to large sawmills, suppliers and retailers in the EU — companies that Earthsight says are falling short of their responsibility to verify that the wood they buy comes from trees cut down in accordance with the law. That means that a significant proportion of the wood found in products around the continent come from illegally harvested sources, Lawson told Mongabay.“It gets used in absolutely everything,” he said. “You can barely look around you without seeing something that could have Ukrainian wood in it.”The timber industry is a huge source of income for the country, bringing in around $1.7 billion every year, roughly 2 percent of Ukraine’s 2016 gross domestic product. But the Earthsight team uncovered evidence of substantial corruption and questionable management of this economically vital resource, extending from the dense forests of western Ukraine on up through the supply chain.An Earthsight-funded study revealed that more than two-thirds of the trees harvested in 2017 were cut down because managers took advantage of a loophole designed to stop the spread of disease. In many cases, forest managers liberally applied this method of “sanitary felling” to clear away more trees than needed to be cut down simply for health reasons, Lawson said.“It’s a common form of malpractice in other parts of the ex-Soviet world,” he said. Trees felled under this pretext account for between 38 and 44 percent of total production and exports — a harvest that Earthsight contends should be considered “unjustified” and “illegal.”A researcher in a “state forestry enterprise” in Zakarpattia, Ukraine. Image © Earthsight.In response to problems within the timber industry, Ukrainian officials banned the export of unprocessed timber in 2015.“If you have a lot of corruption in your logging sector driven by overseas demand,” Lawson said, “then a log export ban is a sensitive thing to do to try and provide some breathing space within which to reform the industry.”In effect, the ban gives a country like Ukraine control over processing facilities, where inspectors can verify the origins of the raw materials coming in, he added.But data from EU customs offices “show that they’re importing huge volumes of logs into Europe that are supposedly banned from export in Ukraine,” Lawson said. And the team found that much of the wood was finding its way into EU countries tagged as fuelwood.Lawson said European authorities were putting pressure on Ukraine to allow round log exports again, using the argument that EU-based companies didn’t have access to enough information that would “persuade” them to stop importing Ukrainian timber.“Why do you have to persuade the importers to comply with the law?” Lawson said. The EU Timber Regulation (EUTR), a set of laws that went into effect in 2013, mandates that companies check the sources of the wood from high-risk sources that they import.“The EUTR is a law,” he added. “It’s not a voluntary thing.”Wood at a sawmill in Lviv, Ukraine. Image © Earthsight.Earthsight turned up evidence of millions of dollars of graft wending its way through the industry. Several key figures in the timber industry appear to have profited personally from corrupt management. In 2017, Roman Cherevaty, the director of a regional forestry board in the Carpathian Mountains, was arrested by police in a sting operation as he tried to bribe officials with payments of $10,000 a month to overlook illegal logging practices.Viktor Sivets, the former head of the national forestry department, has been investigated for taking perhaps 30 million euros ($35.1 million) in bribes at the expense of Ukraine’s forests.“The reason that Sivets was able to run that corrupt scheme was that he was basically able to order individual logging enterprises under his management to sell logs to these overseas buyers at specific prices,” Lawson said. “That was what gave him the power to extract bribes.”Sivets was also an associate of ex-president Viktor Yanukovych, himself accused of running a broadreaching syndicate during his term that may have cost Ukraine $100 billion.Until the 2015 log export ban, Holzindustrie Schweighofer, an Austrian timber processor, had been the leading purchaser of Ukrainian wood. The Earthsight team pointed to filings by Ukrainian prosecutors showing that Schweighofer and several other importers had paid a total of 13 million Euros ($15.2 million) for “marketing” services to Sivets and his wife through “letterbox” companies based in U.K. that often consist of little more than a mailing address. In other cases, these companies were registered in places known for shrouding owners’ identities in secrecy, such as Panama and Belize.A clear-cut site near Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine. Image © Earthsight.“As it is our principle to only act within the framework of every national and international law relevant for our company, we of course strongly reject these allegations,” Thomas Huemer, a spokesman for Schweighofer, said in an email to Mongabay. Huemer added that it was company policy “not to do any business with convicted offenders in the areas of corruption and illegal felling.”Schweighofer and one of the world’s largest panel-making companies, Austria-based EGGER, also received timber that was suspected of having been sold at reduced prices to companies registered in “secrecy jurisdictions” like Belize or Panama, according to Earthsight’s investigation.A spokesperson for EGGER told Mongabay in an email that part of the company’s approach to sustainability involved using wood “from forest thinning [and] hygienic activities as raw materials in the production process, and applying very strict wood procurement policies to ensure control of the wood origin.” Egger did not respond directly to a question about whether sanitary felling was considered a “hygienic” activity.An FSC-certified forest in Zakarpattia in the Ukrainian Carpathians. Image © Earthsight.“Reducing the risks of illegality of wood is EGGER’s highest concern and we will also take further steps of investigation specifically for the wood from Ukraine,” the spokesperson said. “We also count on the support of local authorities and European institutions for a strict law to ensure control of the wood origin.”Lawson said some companies had come to rely on certification by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) in Ukraine to verify that the sources of their timber were legal.“Rather than doing meaningful due diligence as the law requires, they’re buying FSC wood instead, which is failing to fulfill the spirit of what that law is supposed to achieve,” Lawson said.He said the substitution of FSC standards for companies’ own due diligence could be seen as “undermining” the EUTR’s impact, especially given the volume of wood that Ukraine supplies to the rest of the continent.“Your roof, your floor, your table, the newspaper you are holding, all might well be made from Ukrainian wood,” Lawson said in a statement. “And if it is, there is a good chance it was cut or traded illegally, abetted by high-level corruption.”Banner image of railway cars with timber © Earthsight.John Cannon is a Mongabay staff writer based in the Middle East. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: Mongabay has an ongoing collaboration with Earthsight on the Indonesia for Sale series.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more