Has Mike Trout Already Peaked

Has Mike Trout Already Peaked

Mike Trout has put up an amazing couple of seasons in Major League Baseball, not just for someone as young as he is, 22, but for anyone. His 19.62 wins above replacement (WAR) over his first two full seasons ranks as the 36th best two-year stretch for any batter ever. Only nine batters have had a better stretch by the age of 25, and they’re essentially a who’s who of Hall of Famers: Mickey Mantle, Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, Ty Cobb, Lou Gehrig, Rogers Hornsby, Eddie Collins, Jimmie Foxx and Willie Mays. The list of players who put up better numbers at an earlier age doesn’t have any names on it.Conventional wisdom seems to be that Trout, an outfielder for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, is only going to get better. Much of that analysis relies explicitly on the traditional aging curve or on similar logic: MLB players and prospects typically improve rapidly through their late teens and early 20s, peaking around age 27. Trout was 21 last season, ergo, he has several years of improvement in his future.But regression to the mean dictates that the better the performance you’re looking at, the less likely it is to be duplicated. Players who put up huge numbers like Trout’s (or anywhere close) this early in their careers have a very high likelihood of having All Star- and/or Hall of Fame-quality careers. But how often do they improve on these initial breakout performances?I’ve taken all the players who put up more than 15 WAR over a two-year period at any point in their careers and broken them down by the age when they first accomplished the feat. Then I asked a simple question: Did they ever manage a better two-year period?The size of the bubbles represent how many players accomplished the “15 WAR in two years” milestone, and the y value of the bubbles show the percentage of those players who surpassed that milestone.As you can see, the odds of someone Trout’s age improving are ostensibly 100 percent, but that bubble represents a single data point: Alex Rodriguez. If you move to the much larger group of players between ages 22 and 24, the odds drop into the 50 percent range.On the other hand, some players who never managed a stronger two-year stretch still managed a strong third season immediately after their initial two-year breakout. In such cases, they may set a new two-year “peak” that overlaps the original. Thus, while never replicating their original two-year performance, they end up with a better two years on the books. This is the most likely time for a player to establish a new “peak,” because pulling it off only takes one well-timed season instead of two.Of the 75 players who achieved 15-plus WAR over two seasons, only 22 managed to replicate or exceed the feat later in their career. But an additional 15 improved their benchmark the following season. Counting these cases, the odds of a player’s two-year performance being his two-year peak drop substantially. Factoring this in and cleaning up the data a bit (I put the players in rolling 3-year age groups) gives us a result like this:For Trout’s case, there are a few other factors to consider:Cutting both ways: Trout’s numbers are higher than average in his age group. This makes it more likely that he’s a uniquely great player, but it also makes the numbers inherently less likely to be surpassed.Cutting in his favor: Trout was 21 last season, and his group covers players age 21 to 23. This gives him a slightly longer career ahead, and thus more chances to put up better seasons. Further, having pulled off such great numbers at such an early age probably increases the chances that he’s truly special. But there’s not really enough data to demonstrate this effect.Cutting against him: Trout is probably less likely to achieve a new two-year peak this year, because the strongest of the two seasons in this run was the first. Improving on his peak will require him posting better than 10.8 WAR — a feat which has happened only 22 times before, six of which were by Babe Ruth. (Also, though outside the scope of this post, it’s possible that the aging curve is no longer as favorable as it used to be).All things considered, the answer to whether Trout has peaked yet is “probably not,” though I think it’s far from being as much of a certainty as many people seem to think. Even some of the Hall of Famers mentioned above peaked early, and Trout’s start has been so strong that he could potentially do the same and still end up joining them. read more

Ezekiel Elliott blasts coaching staff announces decision to leave after Ohio States

OSU junior running back Ezekiel Elliott (15) stumbles while carrying the ball in a game against Michigan State on Nov. 21. OSU lost, 17-14. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorIn a somber postgame interview room after No. 3 Ohio State’s 17-14 loss to No. 9 Michigan State, a frustrated Ezekiel Elliott did not hold back his feelings after only receiving 12 carries in the upset.The junior running back put the coaching staff on blast about the play-calling and disclosed he spent time in the hospital during the week, while also announcing Saturday was his final game at Ohio Stadium before leaving for the NFL.“It’s very disappointing,” Elliott said. “In the one drive that we had where we kind of had some momentum, when we scored after the strip-sack, the plays we ran, we ran a lot of gap schemes, and we were gassing them.“You saw that on that drive, and we had a lot of momentum, and honestly, we didn’t see those plays at all for the rest of the game. Those plays weren’t called anymore. I asked for those plays to be called and they weren’t, and it hurts, it hurts a lot, because of how we lost. I feel like we weren’t put in the right opportunity to win this game, we weren’t put in the right situation to win this game.”Elliott said his battle with the coaching staff to receive more carries was an ongoing struggle throughout the game, and he blamed the mismanagement for the loss.A slow first half has not been out of the ordinary for Elliott this season, such as against Indiana, but he has typically put up flashy numbers as the game wears on. In Saturday’s contest, however, he only received two handoffs in the second half after rushing 10 times for 30 yards in the first.“It’s kind of been something we’ve seen all season, honestly,” he said. “We’ll have some momentum, we’ll have some plays that work, and then we’ll try to get away from it, try to get cute and run some other stuff.”OSU coach Urban Meyer said after the game that the Spartans dominated the line of scrimmage and loaded up the box to make sure the run game was contained. Even so, Elliott thought he deserved more than his 12 carries — which is his lowest total since the season opener against Virginia Tech when he had 11 carries but 122 yards.Elliott said he was lobbying Meyer all game for more touches but to no avail.“I think I do deserve more than (12) carries,” the St. Louis native said. “I think I really do. I mean, honestly, I can’t speak for the play calling, I don’t know what was going on, I don’t know what they were seeing, but honestly it didn’t work out. It wasn’t working.”Speaking to his frustrations, Elliott said he was never able to receive an explanation for his sudden lack of usage.For Elliott, what made the evening really sting was the journey he took throughout the week to be able to step inside the lines.The junior said he was hospitalized from Monday through Wednesday after a cyst on his right leg became infected. Elliott said at one point he had a 103-degree fever and could not walk because of the pain from the infection.“I didn’t think I was going to play,” he said. “I was depressed in the hospital, crying like a baby, but things turned around, and I was able to go out and practice, no difficulty.”Elliott, who sported a black, protective pad on his right shin during the game, downplayed the infection, saying he was “100 percent.”Meyer echoed that.“He was fine,” the coach said. “He practiced Thursday. And he’s a warrior.”Meyer said the line of scrimmage was so clogged up that it hurt the ground game. Nevertheless, Elliott said he believed the offense would have churned out more than the 132 yards it did had he had an increased volume of carries.To add further insult to injury, the running back said his grandfather had flown in from Finland to watch him play, only to see his lowest rushing total since the Virginia Tech loss in 2014.“It kind of hurts that he has to see me go out like this,” Elliott said. “I just wish I was given an opportunity to do more.”By “go out,” Elliott was alluding to more than this season’s home finale. There is one more schedule game against Michigan, as well as a bowl game, but neither of those tilts will be in Ohio’s capital city. After that, Elliott’s collegiate years will be through, even with a year of eligibility remaining.“Honestly, this is my last game at the ‘Shoe,” Elliott said. “There’s no chance of me coming back next year.”Even with the usual motivation of a game against the Buckeyes’ archrival in the Wolverines, Elliott said he expects to see a side of himself and his teammates not present all season.“We’re hungry. I’m personally not going to let anyone slack off,” Elliott said. “This game means the world to us and everyone in Ohio, and we represent everyone in Ohio. We’re going to come out, and we’re going to play a hell of a ballgame, you’ll see. It’s going to look like a new team.”No matter what happens on the turf in Ann Arbor, Michigan, on Saturday, Elliott said the scars from the loss to the Spartans will be hard for him to put in the rearview mirror.“I’m disappointed,” he said. “I’m disappointed in the play calling, I’m disappointed in the situations we were put in, and I wish it all played out differently.” read more

Olympic Trials Ohio State swimmers compete in Omaha Nebraska

Ohio State junior swimmer Lindsey Clary competes at the Big Ten championships in February, 2016. Credit: OSU AthleticsThe US Olympic Team Swimming Trials began on Sunday with hundreds of competitors attempting to earn a spot and represent team USA in Rio de Janeiro later this summer.Among those athletes were 34 members of the Ohio State men’s and women’s swimming teams looking to trade in their Scarlet and Gray suits for Red, White and Blue.Junior Lindsey Clary placed eighth in the women’s individual medley with a time of 4:42.04 and was the lone Buckeye to advance to an event final. There she took seventh place with a time of 4:42.81. The top two in each event make the Olympic team. On the second day of the trials, Clary was back at again, this time in the women’s 400 meter freestyle. She did not advance and finished 25th with a time of 4:14.04On the first day, senior Chris DePietro competed in the 400 meter individual medley. He finished 70th with a time of 4:31.81.Junior Joey Long competed in the 400 m freestyle and finished with a 3.58.89 time, 54th in the event.The Buckeyes had four representatives in the Men’s 100 meter breaststroke. Recent graduate D.J. MacDonald finished the highest of the four Buckeyes in 24th place with a time of 1:01.67. Junior Jack Barone finished 41st with a time of 1:02.58. Sophomore Frannie Brogan swam with a time of 1:03.50, good for 77th place in this trial. Junior Michael Eaton was the last of the Buckeyes with a time of 1:04.92, finishing 126th.The other female competitor for the Buckeyes, junior Katie Antal, competed in the 100 meter breaststroke. She finished in 100th place.In the first of the male trial rounds of Monday, senior Joshua Fleagle finished in 38th place with a time of 1:50.34.Five Buckeyes competed in the 100 meter breaststroke. Junior Thomas Trace finished the highest in 61st place with a time of 56.56. Next up for the Scarlet and Gray was sophomore Brad Shannon who came in 78th place with a time of 56.81. Senior Matt McHugh finished with a time of 57.38, 126th place. Junior Mark Belanger finished 131st after racing with a time of 57.49 seconds. Senior Andrew Appleby was disqualified.The Olympic Trials will continue until Sunday, July 3rd. read more

Buckeyes stand behind scrutinized coach

Jim Tressel broke the rules and is entering arguably the most embarrassing and potentially damaging chapter of his career. Many are questioning their previously unflinching support of the man known as the Senator. His players are not among them. “(Tressel) has all of our support,” former linebacker Ross Homan said after Ohio State’s Pro Day workout Friday. “I think every player — past, current, present … would take two bullets for that man and everything that he’s done for us.” In an interview with ESPN’s “Outside the Lines,” Christopher Cicero, a Columbus lawyer, said he sent e-mails to Tressel mentioning that Terrelle Pryor and DeVier Posey had connections to Eddie Rife, the owner of Fine Line Ink tattoo parlor in Columbus, who is under a federal drug trafficking investigation. Tressel and Cicero exchanged eight e-mails about the players’ involvement with Rife from April 2 through June 6, 2010. Cicero, a former OSU linebacker and letterman during the 1983 season, did not respond to multiple requests for comment. OSU athletic director Gene Smith declined to comment following the Buckeyes’ 68-61 win against Michigan on Saturday. Pryor and Posey, along with Dan Herron, Mike Adams, Solomon Thomas and Jordan Whiting, were suspended for the start of the 2011 season for selling memorabilia to, and receiving improper benefits from, Rife. Former defensive lineman Dexter Larimore said the team firmly supports Tressel. “Honestly, I think the more I talk to guys in here, they’re kind of locking arms and saying, ‘Coach Tressel is our guy,’” Larimore said. “He’s definitely still my guy, that’s for sure.” On Tuesday, OSU released the e-mail conversation between Cicero and Tressel. OSU representatives on Friday declined to confirm the names of the football players Cicero mentioned. University spokesman Jim Lynch said OSU is required by law to censor information that is specific to individual students. “The Federal Education Rights & Privacy Act requires us to redact any information that can lead to the identity of students, especially a student’s name,” Lynch said in an e-mail to The Lantern. “As caretaker of these documents, we still cannot reveal the student names in the document.” Athletic department spokeswoman Shelly Poe also declined to confirm ESPN’s report, saying in an e-mail to The Lantern, “We will not have any more comments until the NCAA makes its ruling.” OSU’s investigation of the matter resulted in Tressel being suspended for the first two games of 2011 for failing to report the possible infraction to the university after Cicero brought it to his attention. Tressel was fined $250,000 to cover the costs of OSU’s self-investigation. “It’s disappointing that Ohio State’s in that light again,” former wide receiver Dane Sanzenbacher said. “Anytime we’re in the media over something bad happening, everybody’s affected that’s involved in the program, everybody in Columbus. But everyone’s accepting their punishments; everyone’s saying the right things and moving on from here.” read more

TCI Junior Achievement Innovation Camp 2017 Success

TCI Junior Achievement Innovation Camp 2017 Success

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, November 22, 2017 – Providenciales – Junior Achievement TCI hosts another successful Innovation Camp.   This year’s Camp took place in Providenciales and Grand Turk simultaneously.   Seventy-seven students from numerous high schools around Providenciales gathered at The Shore Club for a full day of brainstorming and presentations.   The students were broken down into 11 teams between the ages of 14-18 years old.   In Grand Turk, 59 students gathered at the HJ Robinson High School, breaking down into 12 teams, they worked diligently to create an innovative proposal. For this year’s challenge, both groups were to find a solution or a way to prepare and mitigate the effects of a hurricane.There were many creative resolutions.   Provo’s winning team, 649 Aerial System, proposed the creation of a drone service as a damage assessment tool.  The system would also include an app that not only provided real time damage assessment but hurricane updates and preparedness tips.  The team comprised of Zariah Ingham, Rasheed John, Rodiesha Johnson, Anthonique Asamoah, Ernelle Hall, and Robria Clarke.The winning Grand Turk team, Forecast 5, proposed a mobile app that provides hurricane updates and preparedness tips.   The app would also serve as a friend tracker, satellite radar, and first aid assistant.   The team comprised of Kendrea Gelcius, Llewandra Basden, Raynae Myers, Samantha Marcellus, and Angelia Ariza.   “Each year I’m amazed at the creativity and ingenuity of the young folks that attend the Innovation Camp,” says JATCI board of directors member Angela Musgrove.   “The ideas they come up with are very advanced and great business opportunities.”   Both teams will face off in January with another challenge.   The winner will represent the Turks and Caicos in the regional Innovation Camp 2017.Judges for this year’s camp were representatives from Scotiabank and the Department of Disaster Management.   The duo evaluated each presentation choosing the top 3.   Students were judged on their presentation’s content, creativity, quality, as well as team spirit.   The winning group of the national challenge will represent the country in the regional online Innovation Camp challenge hosted by JA Americas.Junior Achievement is an international program designed to ready students for the future by instilling skills in financial literacy, work readiness, and entrepreneurship.   Junior Achievement is an international non-profit organization focused on inspiring and motivating kids and youth to be ambitious and goal oriented.   At a regional level, Junior Achievement Americas has presence in 31 countries, its programs benefit more than 1 million youth annually.   The Junior Achievement Innovation Camp is regionally funded through a partnership with Scotiabank. JATCI and Scotiabank believe in entrepreneurial education as a way to inspire and prepare youth to become role models for their communities.For further information please contact: Angela Musgrove 649-331-4892 or email [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Unveiling The Secret of Jyotish Gems

Unveiling The Secret of Jyotish Gems

first_imgThere are several books today outlining the precepts of Vedic astrology in different ways. There are readily available versions, often detailing methods to understand the art of horoscopy, to make prediction, to give a little predictability to the future – all in an attempt to define the human condition and be prepared for it in some way.The newest offering on the market for book aficionados of this genre is ‘The Secret of Jyotish Gems: A Guide to the fundamentals of Sacred Astro Gemology of India’ by Guru Arnav. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThis book definitely stands apart from the individual works on astrology and also from those that talk about the power of gemstones and only fleetingly talk about the connection between the two and how it works.The book is wholesome in its approach and brings together an intriguing blend of Hindu astrology and use of natural gemstones as effective remedies. One is able to study the intersection of this two disciplines and understand how they come together, not just to explain why and when events precipitate but also how events/ life can be managed in a better way, through the use of appropriate planetary energy. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe book also attempts to bridge the void that exists between the two branches of knowledge – planetary influences and effective remediation of the same in context of life today. And, it succeeds in its objectives.The author has kept the observation and commentary relevant to modern day life and has offered practical wisdom as to why this is one of the most appropriate choices. There is elaborate chapter detailing the difficulty of incorporating other remedial measures chiefly – tantra, mantra, yantra, aushadhi, among others because of the paucity of an able teacher, lack of availability of sacred herbs and lack of knowledge that can cause limitations. The planetary gem therapy however, easily circumvents these barriers and offers a solution albeit at a monetary cost to bring desired changes in life.While every human being is curious about the possibility of improving their life, the little knowledge that is available is also liberally sprinkled with enough myths and folklore – does nothing but push this powerful change driving discipline into the grey.With this book, Guru Arnav has tried to bring the real change as it binds together pieces of information very logically and succinctly – so much so, that it stands to be the front-runner as a reference book for anyone interested in studying this valuable tradition.What also stands out strikingly is the quality of this book is how easy it is on the eye and images of exotic gemstones make it interesting.As ‘planetary gem therapy’ has always been relevant. Therefore, with this book, it gets to be interesting and exciting as well.’The Secrets of Jyotish GEMS: A Guide to the Fundamentals of Sacred Astro Gemology of India’ and is available in a price of Rs 1995.The book is proved to be a keeper for generations, it is well worththe price.last_img read more